Bend and Brew

Being laid up with a broken knee means you are afforded a lot more time to read all of those books you promised to read. You know the list: the “I’ll read this later” right before you save to Pocket, the dozens of pre-orders that are automatically shipped to your Kindle where it sits neglected as the charge runs low and you spend a month forgetting to plug the damn thing back in.
I found Nick Miller again after slowly rebuilding my Tumblr (never mind what happened to the last one, the cops will never find it) and was reminded of the novel that I never read over the summer.
Isn’t It Pretty To Think So? , derived from the concluding line of Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises, is an excellent comment on our reality-starved, emotionally-static, facebook-fixated times. The story follows Jake Reed through Southern California’s vistas, neighborhoods, lifestyles, succeses and massive failures. 
Initially this comes off as the first novel written about characters who are struggling to be writers. Typically, this makes for a rather narcissistic story. In Miller’s case, it works as the main character talks more about writing than he actually writes (for most of the book, anyway).
My biggest takeaway? Life doesn’t matter much if you loose the appetite to learn. 
Worth checking out. 

Being laid up with a broken knee means you are afforded a lot more time to read all of those books you promised to read. You know the list: the “I’ll read this later” right before you save to Pocket, the dozens of pre-orders that are automatically shipped to your Kindle where it sits neglected as the charge runs low and you spend a month forgetting to plug the damn thing back in.

I found Nick Miller again after slowly rebuilding my Tumblr (never mind what happened to the last one, the cops will never find it) and was reminded of the novel that I never read over the summer.

Isn’t It Pretty To Think So? , derived from the concluding line of Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises, is an excellent comment on our reality-starved, emotionally-static, facebook-fixated times. The story follows Jake Reed through Southern California’s vistas, neighborhoods, lifestyles, succeses and massive failures. 

Initially this comes off as the first novel written about characters who are struggling to be writers. Typically, this makes for a rather narcissistic story. In Miller’s case, it works as the main character talks more about writing than he actually writes (for most of the book, anyway).

My biggest takeaway? Life doesn’t matter much if you loose the appetite to learn. 

Worth checking out. 


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